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The role of the U.S.-Japan alliance in the construction of the East Asian community

Overview

Leader Toru Oga (Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, Kyushu University)
Researcher Yoneyuki Sugita (Osaka University), Eiichi Sakai (Kansai University of Foreign Studies), Mike Mochizuki (George Washington University)、Randall Schweller(Ohio State University)、Charles Walden(University of Pennsilvania)、Muthiah Alagappa (East-West Center)、 Xiaoming Zhang (Peking University)、Yinhong Shi (Renmin University), Jin Young Kim (Pusan National University)
Term July 2012 - March 2013
Research Outline

 The aim of the research proposal is to examine the role of the U.S.-Japan alliance in the comprehensive security of East Asia by reviewing the related fields of traditional and non-traditional security studies, including human security, economic security, and energy security, and the future prospects for U.S.-Japan relations. Although there has already been a huge amount of existing literature written about non-traditional security in general and human security in particular, it does not focus on the relationship between traditional and non-traditional security in terms of U.S.-Japan relations and the East Asian community.
 This research will explore the complications involved in traditional and non-traditional security in terms of U.S.–Japan relations and the East Asian community. It also examines how U.S.–Japan relations contribute to the construction of the East Asian community and how the East Asian community influences U.S.–Japan relations. It does so by examining the complex relationships among human security, economic and energy security, and traditional security policies.
 U.S.–Japan relations have been one of the most important bilateral relationships for Japan and the East Asian community. They have been the main diplomatic agenda that the Japanese government has pursued since the 2000s. The reexamination of U.S.–Japan relations and the East Asian community, therefore, has massive significance in the crucial field of Japanese foreign policy. Although there have been many policy debates on this issue, comprehensive academic outcomes have remained limited: it is a quite significant to explore the comprehensive studies on the East Asian community based on U.S.–Japan relations through this research. Regarding research methods, each research member takes charge of one issue, such as security relations among the U.S., China, and Japan; the security community in East Asia, security threats in the Korean Peninsula; human security; economic security; energy security; or international terrorism, and examines the role of the East Asian community and U.S.–Japan relations in each issue.

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