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USJI Seminar

“Technology Transfer and Technology Development in Post-World War II Japan Triggered by World Bank Projects”

Date and Time

Tuesday, August 7, 2012 10:00am-11:30am

Venue

Conference Room, JSPS/JST Washington Office,
2001 L Street N.W., Suite 1050 Washington D.C. 20036

Technology Transfer and Technology Development in Post-World War II Japan Triggered by World Bank Projects from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.

This event is free and open to the public.

Abstract

The World Bank provided Japan with 31 loan projects between 1953 and 1965 with a total amount of 86.3 million U.S. dollars. The majority of them were for industrial and infrastructure development. Only two projects were aimed at agricultural development. The impact of a project provided as part of ODA may result in changes to the society of the recipient country that go beyond the nominal scope of a project. Such impacts were clearly visible in above-mentioned two loan projects in the 1950s. Both technology transfer and technology development were triggered by these projects. Technology for civil engineering not available in Japan was imported from outside (the United States, in this cases) to Japan for the Aichi Water Canal Project. The Aichi Water Canal Project also resulted in technology transfers in the fields of civil engineering project management. Technology not available anywhere in the world needed to be developed from scratch by the recipient for the Mechanical Land Reclamation Projects. Technology was thus developed by Japanese engineers in the Mechanical Land Reclamation Projects for Konsen Pilot Farm and Shinotsu Peatland Reclamation in Hokkaido. It was found that even an ordinary ODA project, which does not specifically aim at technology transfer or technology development, may lead to significant technology transfer or technology development for a recipient. The way technology transfer and technology development were achieved in these World Bank projects to Japan should provide ODA projects in future with useful guidance, namely how components of technology transfer and technology development may be built in to an ordinary ODA project.

[Summary]

Moderator and Speaker
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Mikiyasu Nakayama
Professor, Division of Environmental Studies, The University of Tokyo
[Presentation Slides (2.3MB)]
Speaker
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Ryo Fujikura
Dean of the Graduate School of Environmental Management, Professor of the Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University
[Presentation Slides (2.4MB)]
Commentator
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Carl Bruch
Senior Attorney and Co-Director of International Programs,Environmental Law Institute
Organized by

U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI)

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