-
  •    U.S.-Japan Research Institute,
       Washington D.C. (Headquarters)
      

       1875 I Street NW, Suite 512,   
       Washington, DC 20006
       Phone: 202-775-4161
       Fax: 202-775-4165
       E-mail:
    usjp@us-jpri.org
     

Reports
Reports



USJI WEEK EVENTS

   Feb. 4, Fri. - Seminar1: Strengthening Post-Conflict Security and Diplomacy : Lessons for U.S. and
                                             Japan ODA Policy and Practice

         7, Mon. - Seminar2: East Asian Security Environment and the Future of Japan-US Alliance
         8, Tue. - USJI Open House
         9, Wed. - Seminar3: Reactivating US - Japan Relations in A Changing Asia
       10, Thur. - Seminar4: How to innovate the higher education role in the new global knowledged-
                                             based society?

                       - Seminar5: A Japan That Can Say Yes: Maintaining Japan's Presence in the United
                                             States and Elsewhere

         11, Fri. - Seminar6: The Current Global Financial Crisis and its effects On US, Japan, and Asia
                                             Pacific Region

                       - Seminar7: Climate Change Policies in the U.S. and Japan


   Overall Host

    Prof. Katsuichi Uchida

        President, USJI

USJI Open House

Introduction about USJI activities and suggestion for possible cooperation with your organization or group.

February 8, Tue., 2011, 10:00am-12:00pm / 1:00pm-5:00pm
USJI Washington Headquarters Office at International Square
 1875 I Street NW, Suite 512, Washington, DC 20006


Host

  Prof. Katsuichi Uchida

    President, USJI
    Vice President, Waseda University

  Dr. Akihiko Tanaka

    Vice Chair, USJI
    Executive Vice President, The University of Tokyo

  Prof. Junichi Mori

    Vice Chair, USJI
    Vice President, Kyoto University

  Dr. Yoshiaki Abe

    Operating Adviser, USJI
    University Professor, Waseda University

 

 

 




 
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Seminar 1: Strengthening Post-Conflict Security and Diplomacy: Lessons for U.S. and Japan ODA Policy and Practice

Over the past twenty years, the United States and Japan have been two of the most substantial sources of international assistance to countries recovering from conflict. In many instances, natural resources have played a prominent role in these peacebuilding efforts. To date, however, there has been little assessment of the effectiveness of the various experiences in managing natural resources to support post-conflict peacebuilding and diplomacy. This seminar highlights ongoing research being undertaken by the Environmental Law Institute (ELI), the University of Tokyo, and the Global Infrastructure Fund (GIF) Research Foundation Japan, with the support of the Center for Global Partnership of the Japan Foundation. Drawing upon examples from Iraq, Liberia, and elsewhere, the seminar highlights opportunities to make US and Japanese official development assistance policies and practice more effective.
[summary: Japanese/ / English]

Joint Organized by Environmental Law Institute and U.S.-Japan Research Institute(USJI)

February 4, Fri., 2011, 12:00pm-2:00pm
Conference Room, The Environmental Law
 2000 L Street NW, Suite 620, Washington, D.C. 20036


Welcome Speech

  Dr. Yoshiaki Abe

    Operating Adviser, USJI
    University Professor, Waseda University


Discussants

  Dr. Lisa Goldman

    Senior Attorney, Counsel, and Co-Director,
    Africa Program, Environmental Law Institute

  Dr. Mikiyasu Nakayama

    Professor, Division of Environmental Studies,
    The University of Tokyo

    presentation

  Dr. Mishkat Al Moumin

    Chief Executive Officer Women and the Environment
    Organization

   Dr. Carl Bruch

    Senior Attorney and Co-Director of International
    Programs, Environmental Law Institute

 




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Seminar 2: East Asian Security Environment and the Future of Japan-US Alliance

The scope the U.S.-Japan alliance covers is now broader than ever before. While the recent North Korean military assault against its southern sibling is a wake up call that in North East Asia the alliance is faced with threats of traditional, modern kind, it must also tackle a complex set of non-traditional, post-modern risks: cyber security, climate change and resultant natural disasters to name only a couple. Geographically the alliance already covers Diego Garcia, yet its range will become even wider as the century proceeds. As a central pillar for the provision of peace and security throughout the region, the U.S.-Japan alliance should also broaden its horizon to more effectively engage other partners such as Australia, India, Korea, and possibly even NATO. Whether the alliance has a cohesive core in its leadership, organizational structure, and operational doctrine to better face up to the challenges both old and new is a central question this seminar aims to answer. Attempted is to lay out the steps Tokyo and Washington should urgently take.
[summary: Japanese// English]

This seminar will be held as a midterm presentation of USJI research project.

C-SPAN3 covered the seminar 2 at the Capital Hilton Hotel on Monday, February 7, 2011.
http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/USJapanRelations36

February 7, Mon., 2011, 9:30am-11:40am
Federal Room B, 2F, Capital Hilton Hotel
1001 16th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036


Moderator

  Mr. Shotaro Yachi

    Professor, Organization for Japan-US Studies,
    Waseda University
    Adviser to the Minister for Foreign Affairs


Panelist

  Mr. Takeo Akiba

    Minister for Political Affairs, the Embassy of Japan
    presentation

  Dr. Patrick Cronin

    Senior Advisor and Senior Director,
    Asia-Pacific Security Program,
    Center for a New American Security

  Mr. Tomohiko Taniguchi

    Senior Guest Fellow (Defense and Security),
    Sojitz Research Institute
    Former Spokesperson at the Japanese Foreign
    Ministry

    presentation

 




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Seminar 3: Reactivating US – Japan Relations in A Changing Asia

Recent events in the U.S., Japan, and Asia have prompted a need to reassess the longstanding bilateral and regional relationships. This program will consider how to build upon the relationship between the U.S. and Japan in managing legal, regulatory and political risks in the Asian Pacific region, and how to effectively facilitate the exchange of human resources between the U.S. and Japan. The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, the oldest graduate school of international affairs in the U.S., through its LLM (Master of Laws) Program in International Law and the Hitachi Center, together with the U.S. Japan Research Institute (USJI), a collaboration of five Japanese universities, will join with the global law firm of K&L Gates LLP for a panel discussion of these issues.

Following the program, a reception will be held with opening remarks from H.E. Ichiro Fujisaki, Ambassador of Japan to the United States and Ambassador Stephen W. Bosworth, Dean, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy / U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy.
[Conference summary: Japanese// English]
[Reception summary: Japanese/ English]

Joint Organized by The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, K&L Gates and U.S.-Japan Research Institute(USJI)

February 9, Wed., 2011, [Conference]3:00pm-5:30pm [Reception]6:00pm-8:00pm
Conference Center, K&L Gates LLP Washington D.C. Office
 1601 K Street, NW, Washington DC, 20006-1600


 

Joint Conference: Leadership and Partnership between the U.S. and Japan in Managing Legal and Political Risk in the Asia Pacific Region


Opening Remarks

  Dr. Katsuhiko Shirai

    Chair, USJI
    Executive Advisor for Academic Affairs,
    The Former President, Waseda University

  Prof. Joel P. Trachtman

    Professor of International Law, The Fletcher School
    of Law and Diplomacy / Director, The Hitachi Center

Introduction

  Prof. Thomas F. Holt, Jr.

    Partner, K&L Gates / Adjunct Professor of
   International Law, The Fletcher School of Law and
   Diplomacy


Panel One: Macro Perspective Panel:
The Future of Trade Negotiation and its Impact on the Legal and Political Environment in the U.S., Japan, and Asia Pacific Region

Moderator

  Prof. Joel P. Trachtman

Panelist

  Prof. Naoyuki Agawa

    Vice Chair, USJI
    Vice President, International Collaboration
    Professor, Faculty of Policy Management,
    Graduate School of Media and Governance,
    Keio University

  Mr. Michael J. O'Neil

    Partner, K&L Gates / North America Director,     Trilateral Commission / Former General Counsel,
    CIA

  Dr. Akihiko Tanaka

    Vice Chair, USJI
    Executive Vice President, The University of Tokyo

 


Panel Two: Micro Perspective Panel:
Corporate Strategy, Operation, and Leadership in Managing Legal, Regulatory and Political Risk in the U.S., Japan, and Asia Pacific Region

Moderator

  Prof. Partha S. Ghosh

    Visiting Professor of Strategic & Innovation
    Management, The Fletcher School of Law and
    Diplomacy / Professor of Practice, Tufts Gordon
    Institute / Former Partner, McKinsey &Company

Panelist

  Hon. Slade Gorton

    Of Counsel, K&L Gates / Former U.S. Senator

  Prof. Junichi Mori

    Vice Chair, USJI
    Vice President, Kyoto University

  Mr. Carl Green

    Senior Advisor, Former Senior Representative,
    Hitachi Corporate Office in Washington D.C.


Joint Networking Reception: Facilitating Human Resource Exchanges between the U.S. and Japan

Opening Remarks

  H.E. Ichiro Fujisaki

    Ambassador of Japan to the United States

  Ambassador Stephen W. Bosworth

    Dean, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy /
    U.S. Special Representative for North Korea Policy

Special Speeches: The Role of Universities and Corporations in Facilitating Human Resource Exchanges between the U.S. and Japan

  Prof. Thomas F. Holt, Jr.

    

  Mr. Takashi Ohde

    Corporate Officer and General Manager,
   Hitachi Corporate Offices, D.C. & L.A., Hitachi, Ltd.

  Prof. Joel P. Trachtman

  Prof. Katsuichi Uchida

    President, USJI
    Vice President, Waseda University
























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Seminar 4: How to innovate the higher education role in the new global knowledged-based society?

This session will focus on discussing the role of higher education in the new global knowledge-based society, and seeking possibilities for innovation and cooperation. Higher education institutions in the 21st century are expected to play a significant role in solving various global issues by educating younger generations and through the enhancement of science and technology.
We are aiming to find a new paradigm for a pragmatic strategy to provide a global education, quality assurance in higher education in the global era, and innovation through the strengthening of cooperative international researches etc.
The three panelists have an abundance of pragmatic experience as former presidents of leading universities and are influential in higher education spheres, both in their respective countries and internationally. They will discuss the above-mentioned issues from their own perspectives and try to clarify common issues to be shared, while focusing on the future direction for higher education activities.
At present, while transnational cooperation in higher education and scholarship programs propelled by the EU, such as the Socrates, Erasmus and Erasmus Mundus Scholarships, are expanding, the ASEAN countries have also started their own collaborative program. All countries share a common interest in the role of higher education and effective administration in the global knowledge-based society. This session covers the newly implemented “Campus Asia” plan for increasing higher education collaboration among Japan, China and South-Korea, and will cover Japan’s coordination with the United States and Asian nations, while providing an excellent opportunity to discuss proposals from various perspectives, including from a practical point of view, and will surely prove to be the starting point for further global discussions.
[summary: Japanese// English]

February 10, Thur., 2011, 10:00am-11:40am
Statler A,B, 2F, Capital Hilton Hotel
 1001 16th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036


Opening Remarks

  H.E. Ichiro Fujisaki

    Ambassador of Japan to the United States


Moderator

  Dr. Akihiko Tanaka

    Vice Chair, USJI
    Executive Vice President, The University of Tokyo


Panelist

  Dr. Katsuhiko Shirai

    Chair, USJI
    Executive Advisor for Academic Affairs,
    The Former President, Waseda University

    presentation

  Dr. Stephen Joel Trachtenberg

    President Emeritus and University Professor of
    Public Service, George Washington University

  Dr. Xu Zhihong

    The Former President, Peking University
    presentation

 

 






 
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Seminar 5: A Japan That Can Say Yes: Maintaining Japan's Presence in the United States and Elsewhere

Is Japan declining? Some seem to believe so. They cite her shrinking and aging population, lingering economy, and increasingly introverted youth, among other factors, as evidence of this. The issue, however, is not whether this perception is correct, but what Japan can do to reverse the trend and how to convince people of the United States and other countries that Japan continues to matter. This seminar will take a fresh look at the images and realities of Japan's place in the world today and explore ways in which Japan can change and correct a seemingly growing popular perception that Japan no longer has the will nor the power to compete in the world arena. It will do so in the context of Japan's roles and missions in security, economy and culture, with emphasis upon the implications of such a perception for the future of U.S.-Japan relations.
[summary: Japanese// English]

February 10, Thur., 2011, 2:00pm-4:00pm
Statler A,B, 2F, Capital Hilton Hotel
 1001 16th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20036


Moderator

  Prof. Naoyuki Agawa

    Vice Chair, USJI
    Vice President, International Collaboration
    Professor, Faculty of Policy Management,
    Graduate School of Media and Governance,
    Keio University


Panelist

  Dr. Kevin M Doak

    Professor & Nippon Foundation Endowed Chair
    in Japanese Studies Department of East Asian
    Languages and Cultures, Georgetown University

    presentation

  Ms. Irene Hirano Inouye

    President, U.S.-Japan Council
    presentation

  Dr. Daniel M. Kliman

    Visiting Fellow, the Center for a New American
    Security

    presentation

  Mr. Takeo Mori

    Minister for Economic Affairs, Embassy of Japan

 






 
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Seminar 6: The Current Global Financial Crisis and its effects On US, Japan, and Asia Pacific Region

The session evaluates the effects of the current global financial crisis on the world economy by putting special emphasis on US, Japan and Asia Pacific region. Its effects both on trade and financial sectors will be clarified. Through the process, the panelists will inevitably examine the influence of so called global imbalances as an important underlining condition toward global as well as region economic recovery. They will then explore the implications of the global financial crisis on foreign economic policy of the United States and Japan toward Asia-Pacific regional cooperation.
[summary: Japanese// English]

This seminar will be held as a midterm presentation of USJI research project.

February 11, Fri., 2011,  10:00am-12:00pm
Senate Room, 2F, Capital Hilton Hotel
 1001 16th Street NW,  Washington, D.C. 20036


Moderator

  Dr. Keiji Nakatsuji

    Operating Adviser, USJI
    Professor of International History, Graduate
    School ofInternational Relaitons, Ritsumeikan
    University


Presenter

 Impeding Effects of Global Imbalances on
 Recovery from Financial Crises
  Dr. Nobuhiko Hibara

    Operating Adviser, USJI
    Associate Professor of Finance, School of Business
    Administration, Ritsumeikan University

    presentation


 Japan's strategy towards Asia-Pacific regionalism
 in the aftermath of the global crisis
  Dr. Mireya Solis

    Associate Professor, School of International Service,
    American University

    presentation


 Trade Finance and the Great Trade Collapse
  Dr. David Weinstein

    Carl S. Shoup Professor of Japanese Economy,
    Columbia University
    Associate Director for Research Center on Japanese
    Economy and Business

    presentation

Discussant

  Mr. Kiyoaki Aburaki

    US Representative,
    Keidanren and the 21st Century Public Policy Inst.
    Visiting Fellows,
    Center for Strategic and International Studies

  Dr. Sachio Nakato

    Professor, College of International Relations,
    Department of International Relations, Ritsumeikan
    University

 






 
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Seminar 7: Climate Change Policies in the U.S. and Japan

To reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions as targeted by the administrations in the U.S. and Japan, considerable efforts by households, businesses and local communities are inevitable. Regulators also face challenges to set certain reduction incentives for these economic agents and to monitor their reduction activities. We examine the local approaches to the climate change problems and discuss the policy mechanism for the reduction in both countries and try deriving useful policy implications. The presentations are based on the recent empirical study on local efforts on climate change by Bochniarz and Gemma (2010) and the theoretical paper by Tsur and de Gorter (2011).
[summary: Japanese/ English]

This seminar will be held as a midterm presentation of USJI research project.

February 11, Fri., 2011,  2:00pm-4:00pm
Senate Room, 2F, Capital Hilton Hotel
 1001 16th Street NW,  Washington, D.C. 20036


Moderator

  Dr. Masahiko Gemma

    Operating Adviser, USJI
    Professor & Director, Faculty of Social Sciences and
    the Institute of Japan-US Studies,
    Waseda University


Paper Presenter

  Dr. Zbigniew Bochniarz

    Visiting Professor, Evans School of Public Affairs,
    University of Washington

    presentation

  Dr. Yacov Tsur

    Professor & Head, Department of Agricultural
    Economics & Management, The Hebrew University
    of Jerusalem

    presentation

Panelist

  Ms. Jane Nakano

    Fellow, Energy and National Security Program,
    Center for Strategic and International Studies

    presentation

  Mr. Tatsuya Shinkawa

    Chief Representative
    Representative Office in Washington, DC,
    New Energy and Industrial Technology Development
    Organization

    presentation

  Dr. Harry de Gorter

    Professor, Charles H. Dyson School of Applied
    Economics and Management, Cornell University






 

Organized by :

U.S.-JAPAN Research Institute(USJI)

Supported by :

Keio University, Kyoto University, Ritsumeikan University,
The University of Tokyo, Waseda University

Sponsored by:

The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership


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