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USJI Week

SEPTEMBER 5-9, 2013

Event Schedule

Sep. 5 (Thu.)
Event1
(10:00am-12:00pm)
How Can the Obama and Abe Administrations Manage the Alliance to Promote Common Prosperity in the Asia-Pacific?
Event2
(1:00pm-3:00pm)
How Can the Obama and Abe Administrations Manage Multiple FTAs to Promote Common Prosperity in the Asia-Pacific?
Event3
(5:30pm-7:00pm)
Building the TOMODACHI Generation Program Launch and Networking Reception
Sep. 6 (Fri.)
Event4
(10:00am-11:30am)
Typology of Inbound Foreign Direct Investment in Japan
Event5
(1:00pm-3:00pm)
Contribution of US-Japan exchange of researchers in development of the molecular basis of dental and maxillofacial regenerative medicine leading collaboration among South-East Asian countries and US-Japan
Event6
(3:30pm-5:00pm)
The Possibilities and Issues of Globalized and Open Higher Education for Japan and U.S. Universities (Cancelled)
Sep. 9 (Mon.)
Event7
(2:00pm-3:30pm)
Cutting-edge Social Science Research of International Tuna Negotiations

Admission is free, but seating for these events is limited.

Event 1: How Can the Obama and Abe Administrations Manage the Alliance to Promote Common Prosperity in the Asia-Pacific?

Date and Time

Sep. 5 (Thu.) 10:00am-12:00pm

Venue

South American B, 2nd Floor, Capital Hilton
1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036


Event 1: How Can the Obama and Abe Administrations Manage the Alliance to Promote Common Prosperity in the Asia-Pacific? from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.

Abstract

This seminar will examine how Japan and the United States could establish an in-depth and wide range of possible strategic partnerships in the “renewed” political context in Japan, with a focus on security issues. Abe Administration apparently has made significant changes in security policy from the predecessors, by buttressing the Kantei (the Prime Minister’s Office) to lead diplomatic moves and policy coordination, rebuilding trust with the U.S., standing firm against Chinese challenges on the seas, and announcing its greater role in regional security. How can Abe take an advantage of current political stability to exert his leadership in security issues? How can the United States and Japan cooperate to engage constructively with China in maintaining maritime security, resources and above all the regional order?
In this seminar, both Japanese and the U.S. government representatives will review their security strategy, priorities and challenges under the current administration, and experts on security issues in Asia will elaborate on possible strategic partnerships between the U.S. and Japan in the regional context, including the issues such as maritime security, cyber threats, military/defense cooperation, denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, and humanitarian cooperation. Professor Yachi, facilitator and commentator of this session, will facilitate discussions by making critical comments and inviting the floor to the Q and A session with the panelists.

Moderator
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Shotaro Yachi
Visiting Professor, Waseda University
Speakers
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Michael E. O’Hanlon
Senior Fellow and Director of Research, The Brookings Institution
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Jun Osawa
Visiting Fellow, The Brookings Institution / Senior Research Fellow, Institute for International Policy Studies
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Hon. Kenichiro Sasae
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to the United States of America
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James Zumwalt
Deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, U.S. Department of State
Co-host by

The Brookings Institution / Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies
brookings

Event 2: How Can the Obama and Abe Administrations Manage Multiple FTAs to Promote Common Prosperity in the Asia-Pacific?

Date and Time

Sep. 5 (Thu.) 1:00pm-3:00pm

Venue

South American B, 2nd Floor, Capital Hilton
1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036


Event 2: How Can the Obama and Abe Administrations Manage Multiple FTAs to Promote Common Prosperity in the Asia-Pacific? from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.

Abstract

The re-election of Shinzo Abe as Prime Minister in December 2012 changed the economic and political landscape radically and rapidly. Abe’s decision to promote monetary easing schemes as a tool to help Japan overcome deflation, which has stalled the Japanese economy for many years, contributed to Abe’s high degree of public support. Taking advantage of the trend, Abe then announced Japan’s official participation in the TPP negotiation in March 2013, the decision of which had been viewed as extremely difficult during the DPJ era due to powerful farming lobbies and strong oppositions by politicians from rural constituencies. This means Japan and the United States would be able to forge a partnership to disseminate trade and investment policy norms based on those of developed countries, including ones relating to labor and environmental regulations.
On the other hand, Japan does a significant volume of trade with major Asian countries such as China, South Korea, India, and Indonesia, none of whom currently participate in TPP, and, many Japanese companies have set up a wide range of production networks involving these countries. In addition, these non-TPP members in Asia tend to protect some of their key industries (e.g., China imposes a 25% tariff on automobiles), so progress in the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), an East Asian integration framework, is also important as a tool to open these key markets to Japanese exports.
The TPP can be also viewed as a means of strengthening strategic relations with the United States – the key nation for maintaining regional stability. If the TPP is regarded as a key component of US President Barack Obama’s “pivot” or “rebalancing” to Asia, whose primary aim is to check China’s aggressive behavior in maritime territorial disputes in the East and South China Sea, it could be argued that the TPP is a political tool intended to assist this American strategic objective as well as those of its allies and partners.
This seminar, jointly organized by the Brookings Institution and WOJUSS, intends to examine the implications of the emerging regional structure initiated by the development of the TPP, especially after Japan joined the negotiation in July 2013. The issues highlighted includes how both governments can overcome differing domestic regulatory systems to conclude the TPP; how Japan balances the TPP negotiations and the RCEP initiatives; how Japan and the US can engage with China through the promotion of their common economic rules and norms, and how the Abe administration can respond to Obama’s Pivot strategy.

Moderator
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Takashi Terada
Operating Adviser, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Professor, Doshisha University
Speakers
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Masahiko Gemma
Operating Adviser, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Professor, Waseda University
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Mireya Solis
Knight Chair in Japan Studies and Senior Fellow at the Brookings Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies / Associate Professor, American University
Co-host by

The Brookings Institution / Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies
brookings

Granted by

The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership

Event 3: Building the TOMODACHI Generation Program Launch and Networking Reception

Date and Time

Sep. 5 (Thu.) 5:30pm-7:00pm (Wine, soft drinks, and hors d’oeuvres will be served.)

Venue

Congressional Room, 2nd Floor, Capital Hilton
1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036

Join us.
Building the TOMODACHI Generation: A Partnership to Engage U.S. and Japanese College Students in Social Problem-Solving
Enjoy an evening with visiting Japanese leaders, foreign policy experts, corporate and NGO leaders at the forefront of Japan’s response to the March 11 disasters, and learn more about a ground-breaking program to address the devastation.
The Washington Center and U.S.-Japan Research Institute are grateful to Toyota Motor Corporation, Mitsubishi Corporation, Hitachi, Ltd. and Morgan Stanley for their outstanding support of the program.

Opening Remarks
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Katsuichi Uchida
President, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Vice President and Professor, Waseda University
Welcome Remarks
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Irene Hirano Inouye
President, U.S.-Japan Council
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Hon. Kenichiro Sasae
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to the United States of America
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IreneMichael B. Smith
President, The Washington Center
Co-host by

The U.S.-Japan Council’s TOMODACHI Initiative / The Washington Center

TWC

Event 4: Typology of Inbound Foreign Direct Investment in Japan

[Summary]

Date and Time

Sep. 6 (Fri.) 10:00am-11:30am

Venue

South American B, 2nd Floor, Capital Hilton
1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036

Abstract

During the past two decades, researchers and practitioners alike have been focusing on foreign direct investment (FDI) originating from mostly mature economies towards emerging economies. However, the important foreign investment flows that these mature economies attract nonetheless have not been given the same attention. The case of Japan is rather significant, since the country is confronted to challenges largely shared among other OECD countries but has been attracting far less foreign investment, as reflected by dismal FDI stock and flows respectively.
Using a Delphi methodology, a qualitative approach relying on US foreign direct investors’ and experts’ contributions, we propose a model of inbound FDI in Japan and identify three types of investors based on the nature of investments and market maturity. Niche players, filling a local gap with differentiation, have entered less mature markets by setting up operations from scratch. Rescuers have taken over ailing local companies in mature markets. And cherry-pickers have acquired promising local companies in developing markets. Our model can help investors recognize investment opportunities in Japan and in mature economies facing a shrinking domestic market and increased international competition.
Future research should focus specifically on US inbound FDI to determine whether US firms fit the proposed typology, and to identify key policies to facilitate foreign investments in Japan.

Moderator and Speaker
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Remy Magnier-Watanabe
Associate Professor, University of Tsukuba
[Presentation Slides (0.2MB)]
Speakers
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James W. Fatheree
President of the U.S.-Japan Business Council / Senior Director for Japan and Korea at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce
[Presentation Slides (0.2MB)]
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James Hoadley
Associate Director of Center for International Business Education and Research, Georgia Institute of Technology
[Presentation Slides (1.4MB)]

Event 5: Contribution of U.S.-Japan Exchange of Researchers in Development of the Molecular Basis of Dental and Maxillofacial Regenerative Medicine Leading Collaboration among South-East Asian Countries and U.S.-Japan

[Summary]

Date and Time

Sep. 6 (Fri.) 1:00pm-3:00pm

Venue

South American B, 2nd Floor, Capital Hilton
1001 16th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20036

Abstract

Cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) is the most common congenital craniofacial anomaly in the world. The prevalence of CLP ranges 1 out of 500 to 700 all over the world with some regional variation. Huge amount of medical resources are needed to treat these patients to habilitate the deficient function, such as speech, eating and breathing because of the tooth, bone, muscle and skin deficiency. So far, those patients are mainly treated with symptomatic treatment which would not provide sufficient outcome. Some of the patients can access to current treatment modality in the developed countries, while those who in the developing countries would not.
On the one hand, remarkable development of regenerative medicine based on the research outcome of molecular biomedical science has been revealed to overcome those problems. Specifically, U.S.-Japan exchange of researchers has largely contributed to the development of regenerative medicine, which will be enhanced more and more in the near future. Recently, exchange of researchers and dentist among south-east Asian countries and Japan has become more active than before. On the basis of this background, further and strong activation of these relationship in pan-pacific region is expected. In the present seminar, we would like to demonstrate the present conditions and problems.

Moderator
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Ichiro Takahashi
Operating Adviser, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Professor, Kyushu University
Speakers
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Naoto Haruyama
Assistant Professor, Kyushu University
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Yoshihide Mori
Professor, Kyushu University
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Kazuaki Nonaka
Professor, Kyushu University
Yamada_201509
Yoshihiko Yamada
Chief and Senior Investigator, National Institutes of Health
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Haruyoshi Yamaza
Assistant Professor, Kyushu University

Event 6: The Possibilities and Issues of Globalized and Open Higher Education for Japan and U.S. Universities (Cancelled)

Event 6 has been cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances. USJI truly apologizes for any inconveniences we have caused.

Event 7: Cutting-edge Social Science Research of International Tuna Negotiations

[Summary]

Date and Time

Sep. 9 (Mon.) 2:00pm-3:30pm

Venue

Conference Room, JSPS/JST Washington Office
2001 L Street NW, Suite 1050 Washington, DC 20036

Abstract

Despite the recent alarming scientific findings and debate on global tuna collapses, social science, which has the power to explain such failure, to evaluate the extent of successful and failed fisheries management in terms of problem solving or improvement from a certain point of time, and to provide policy solutions, remains largely silent on international fisheries management. This seminar focuses on the global tuna fisheries management from a cutting-edge social science perspective, provided by the participants in a Japanese research initiative that is one of the world’s largest social science research projects on global tuna management. Concretely, the presentations will review the essence, the current status, and briefly evaluate policy remedies of tuna overfishing and bycatch with an emphasis on Japan. It is our great pleasure to announce that Susan Lieberman, the former Director of International Policy of the PEW Environment Group will join us in the debate as a commentator.

Moderator
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Hiroshi Ohta
Professor
Waseda University
[Presentation Slides (0.4MB)]
Speakers
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Atsushi Ishii
Associate Professor, Tohoku University

[Presentation Slides (0.1MB)]

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Susan Lieberman
Former Senior Director, The Pew Charitable Trusts
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Ayako Okubo
Lecturer, Tokai University
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Isao Sakaguchi
Professor, Gakushuin University
[Presentation Slides (0.4MB)]
Co-host by

Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies

Organized by: U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI)

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