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Events

USJI Week

February 24 - March 3 and March 12, 2020

Event Schedule

Feb. 24 (Mon.)
Event1
The future of the U.S.-Japan trade agreement and America’s approach to the Indo-Pacific (Invitation Only)
Feb. 25 (Tue.)
Event2
( 10:00a.m.- 11:30a.m.)
Competition and Cooperation: Redefining Asia’s Economic Objectives
Feb. 26 (Wed.)
Event3
( 3:00p.m.- 5:00p.m.)
U.S.-China Relations and Implications for Washington-Tokyo Ties: Congressional Perspectives
Feb. 27 (Thu.)
Event4
( 4:30p.m.- 6:00p.m.)
The Global Effects of US-China, Japan-ROK Economic Decoupling
Feb. 28 (Fri.)
Event5
Economic and Psychological Impacts of Natural Disasters
(Invitation Only)
Mar. 2 (Mon.)
Event6
( 12:30p.m.- 2:00p.m.)
China-Japan Cooperation for Asian Multilateralism?: BRI, AIIB, and RCEP
Mar. 3 (Tue.)
Event7
( 12:30p.m.- 2:00p.m.) – Light Lunch Buffet at the beginning
The Rise of China and the International Order in Transition
Mar. 12 (Thu.)
Event8
(12:30p.m.-2:00p.m.) – Light Lunch Buffet at the beginning
Challenges of UN Peacebuilding and Mediation: Roles of Japan, USA, and UN

Due to concerns over the spread of Coronavirus, we regretfully announce the cancellation of this event.

Admission is free, but seating for these events is limited.

Event1

: The future of the U.S.-Japan trade agreement and America’s approach to the Indo-Pacific (Invitation Only)

Date

Feb. 24 (Mon.)

Speaker
Shujiro Urata
Professor, Waseda University
Co-hosted by

The Brookings Institution

Event2

: Competition and Cooperation: Redefining Asia’s Economic Objectives

Date and Time

Feb. 25 (Tue.) 10:00a.m.- 11:30a.m.

Venue

5th Floor, Woodrow Wilson Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20004

Report
Abstract

Trade relations in Asia remain uncertain in spite of the recent rapprochement between the United States and China. For countries in the region, the challenge remains to craft stable relations that would secure their economic as well as political security amid the rise of great power competition. The definition of a good trade deal continues to evolve as a result, as does what constitutes strong economic relations. Join us for a discussion on the benefits and limitations of trade agreements that meet national economic objectives, and prospects for cooperation among Northeast and Southeast Asian nations as tensions remain between Washington and Beijing.

Moderator
Shihoko Goto
Deputy Director for Geoeconomics and Senior Associate for Northeast Asia, Asia Program
Speakers
Kent Calder
Director, Reischauer Center for East Asian Studies, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced international Studies
Shujiro Urata
Professor, Waseda University
Shintaro Hamanaka
Public Policy Fellow, Overseas Research Fellow, Institute of Developing Economies
Kent Hughes
Public Policy Fellow, Former Director, Program on America and the Global Economy, Woodrow Wilson Center
Co-hosted by

Wilson Center
Wilson Center

Event3

: U.S.-China Relations and Implications for Washington-Tokyo Ties: Congressional Perspectives

Date and Time

Feb. 26 (Wed.) 3:00p.m.- 5:00p.m.

Venue

The Reischauer Center
The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies(SAIS),
The Johns Hopkins University
Rome Auditorium , ROME Building,1619 Massachusetts Ave NW Washington, DC 20036

Abstract

The U.S.-China relationship has become more confrontational in recent years and, despite the recent trade deal, appears headed toward even greater contention in the future. The deterioration in the relationship has widespread implications for countries across the Asia Pacific, particularly as America’s willingness to play its traditional leadership role in the region has come under question and as many countries believe they may ultimately come to believe that they face a zero-sum choice over siding with Beijing or Washington. Japan in particular is increasingly concerned that the growing rift in U.S.-China ties may have negative effects on its crucial ties to the United States. This seminar will examine how the fraught U.S.-China relationship is affecting those ties with a primary perspective from Capitol Hill.

Session 1
Moderator
Mieko Nakabayashi
USJI Operating Advisor / Professor, Waseda University
Speakers
Former Rep. Charles Boustany(R-LA)
Counselor, National Bureau for Asian Research
Ken Levinson
Executive Director, Washington International Trade Association
Paul Sracic
Professor, Youngstown State University
Session 2
Moderator
Daniel Bob
Visiting Scholar, Reischauer Center
Speakers
Ely Ratner
Executive Vice President and Director of Studies,
Center for a New American Security
Emma Chanlett-Avery
Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service
Co-hosted by

The Reischauer Center
The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies(SAIS),
The Johns Hopkins University

View related topics

Event4

: The Global Effects of US-China, Japan-ROK Economic Decoupling

Date and Time

Feb. 27 (Thu.) 4:30p.m.- 6:00p.m.

Venue

The Reischauer Center
The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies(SAIS),
The Johns Hopkins University
Rome Building, Rome 806, 1619 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington, DC 20036

Report
Abstract

This presentation will explore why the ongoing two cases of decoupling between the US and China and between Japan and South Korea can lead to devastating economic outcomes in the world economy and how we can prevent the decoupling. In the first part, I will emphasize roles of (1) propagation of economic shocks through global supply chains, (2) vicious cycles between protectionism and economic stagnation, and (3) intrinsic closed nature of human beings, in aggravating the total effect of the decoupling. In the latter part, I will propose (1) to build clear and detailed international rules that allow countries to restrict trade and investment for national security purposes so that politics and economies can be separated to a large extent, and (2) to promote international exchange programs for mutual understandings across countries so that excessive tensions can be alleviated.

Speaker
Yasuyuki Todo
Professor, Waseda University
Co-hosted by

The Reischauer Center
The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies(SAIS),
The Johns Hopkins University

TGU Center for Positive/Empirical Analyses of Political Economy, Waseda University

Event5

: Economic and Psychological Impacts of Natural Disasters
(Invitation Only)

Date

Feb. 28 (Fri.)

Speaker
Yasuyuki Todo
Professor, Waseda University
Co-hosted by

The World Bank

Event6

: China-Japan Cooperation for Asian Multilateralism?: BRI, AIIB, and RCEP

Date and Time

Mar. 2 (Mon.) 12:30p.m.- 2:00p.m.

Venue

Room 505
Elliott School of International Affairs
1957 E Street NW, 5th floor
Washington, D.C. 20052

Abstract

China has actively endeavored to improve its ties with major countries in the region, such as Japan and India, in a bid to dominate the regional rulemaking process for trade, investment, and infrastructure. Although Japan has retained its cautious and critical views toward China’s global and regional economic initiatives, President Trump’s radical protectionism with increased tariffs on key products such as automobiles has led Japan to consider the possibility of working with China to build a regional economic order as a way of reducing negative impacts of U.S. protectionism on its trade and investment. This strategic and economic calculation paved the way for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to Beijing in November 2018, putting relations on the right track and trumpeting the possibility of a new era of cooperation rather than competition in the Sino-Japanese relationship, and making it possible for President Xi Jinping to pay his first visit to Japan to attend the G20 Summit held in Osaka in June 2019. This panel aims to examine the economic and strategic implications of the growing improvement in the China-Japan relationship for the United States which has emphasized bilateralism and downplayed the strengths and advantages of multilateralism at the same time that it is seeking to strengthen its position toward China.

Moderator
Mike Mochizuki
Associate Professor, The George Washington University
Panelists
Saori Katada
Professor of Political Science and International Relations at the University of Southern California
Takashi Terada
USJI Operating Advisor / Professor of International Relations at Dōshisha University, Kyoto, Japan
Discussant
Albert Keidel
Adjunct Graduate Professor of Economics, George Washington University
Co-hosted by

Sigur Center for Asian Studies, The George Washington University

View related topics

Event7

: The Rise of China and the International Order in Transition

Date and Time

Mar. 3 (Tue.) 12:30p.m.- 2:00p.m.
– Light Lunch Buffet at the beginning

Venue

USJI Office Seminar Room (2000M)
2000 M Street NW, B1, Washington D.C. 20036

Abstract

Does China’s rise mean that the country is going to take the increasing leadership in the current liberal order, especially due to the possibility of greater isolationism under a Trump government in the United States? Could China develop a new international order, as an alternative to the current one? The answer could be somewhere in between; in other words, Beijing aims to take the lead in the current liberal order, while it also aims to form its own version of international order, including through initiatives such as emerging financial institutions and the “Belt and Road” trade routes announced after 2013 under President Xi Jinping.
While analysts often focus on the challenges that China presents to democracies, few pay sufficient attention to the challenges China itself faces in leading the current order or creating a new one.
This seminar identifies China’s own challenges inside and outside of the country, and explores their implication for a broader debate on the future of the international order.

Moderator/Commentator
Mike Mochizuki
Associate Professor, The George Washington University
Speakers
Rumi Aoyama
Professor, Waseda University
Miwa Hirono
Associate Professor, Ritsumeikan University
View related topics
  • The Re-emergence of China and the Changing International Order
  • Event8

    : Challenges of UN Peacebuilding and Mediation: Roles of Japan, USA, and UN
    Due to concerns over the spread of Coronavirus, we regretfully announce the cancellation of this event.

    Date and Time

    Mar. 12 (Thu.) 12:30p.m.-2:00p.m.
    – Light Lunch Buffet at the beginning

    Venue

    USJI Office Seminar Room (2000M)
    2000 M Street NW, B1, Washington D.C. 20036

    Abstract

    The seminar will discuss how US, Japan, and UN can work for providing positive solutions on peace negotiation, mediation, and peacebuilding. Daisaku Higashi, professor at Sophia University will share his research on Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and South Sudan, and eliminate the key challenges of peace processes. Jake Sherman, Director of the International Peace Institute’s Brian Urquhart Center for Peace Operations, will share the basic components of UN reforms launched in the beginning of 2019. Kazuhiro Maeshima, professor at Sophia University will moderate the discussion and make comments on the presentations by two speakers, reflecting his assessment about current US foreign policies.
    Brochure

    Moderator/Commentator
    Kazuhiro Maeshima
    USJI Operating Advisor / Professor, Sophia University
    Speakers
    Daisaku Higashi
    Professor, Sophia University
    Jake Sherman
    Director of the Brian Urquhart Center for Peace Operations, International Peace Institute

     

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