-
  •    U.S.-Japan Research Institute,
       Washington D.C. (Headquarters)
      

       1875 I Street NW, Suite 512,   
       Washington, DC 20006
       Phone: 202-775-4161
       E-mail:
    usjp@us-jpri.org
     

Events
USJI Week


USJI Week Events

Feb. 25 (Mon.)
Event 1 (10:00am-11:45am): Understanding Our Challenges in Energy, Food and Climate Change: Implications for the U.S. and Japan
Event 2 (3:00pm-4:30pm): Disaster Resilience 2030; U.S. and Japan

Feb. 26 (Tue.)
Event 3 (3:00pm-4:30pm): The Korean Peninsula in the 21st Century
Event 4 (6:00pm-7:30pm): Reasoning in Pragmatism and the Analysis of the U.S. Perspective on Japan and Korea (Students Only)

Feb. 28 (Thu.)
Event 5 (10:00am-11:40am): The U.S. Pivot to Asia and Japan, China, and Korea - How Can New Leaders in Northeast Asia Maintain the Regional Peace? (Part 1: America's TPP, CJK's Trilateral FTA, and Domestic Adjustment Problems)
Event 6 (2:00pm-3:30pm): Introduction to the Project: The Role of the U.S.-Japan Alliance in the Construction of the East Asian Community

Mar. 1 (Fri.)
Event 7 (10:00am-11:40am): The U.S. Pivot to Asia and Japan, China, and Korea - How Can New Leaders in Northeast Asia Maintain the Regional Peace? (Part 2: Maritime Security in East Asia and CJK Problems)
Event 8 (2:00pm-3:30pm): Evaluating Japanese Growth and Rebirth Strategy?; Is Abe Inheriting DPJ's Policy?

Admission is free, but seating for these events is limited.

Event 1: Understanding Our Challenges in Energy, Food and Climate Change: Implications for the U.S. and Japan

[Summary]


Date and Time
Feb. 25 (Mon.) 10:00am-11:45am

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington D.C. 20036


Event 1: Understanding Our Challenges in Energy, Food and Climate Change: Implications for the U.S. and Japan from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


REGISTER

Abstract
With the prolonged world-wide recessions, efforts for reducing GHG emissions have slowed down even in developed countries. Concerns seem to have shifted to how we adjust our lives to the world with the influence of climate change. This seminar is orginized to understand and discuss the current conditions and policy options in the global context and the implications for the U.S. and Japan. The conflicts between energy security, and food and nutricion policies are reviewed. Research outputs on climate change issues are also presented. The implications are also disscussed for the U.S. and Canada, and Japan and Asia.

Moderator & Commentator
Masahiko Gemma, Operating Adviser, U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI) / Professor, Waseda University

Speakers
Simla Tokgoz, Research Fellow, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)
[Presentation Slides (0.3MB)]

Yacov Tsur, Ruth Ochberg Professor, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
[Presentation Slides (0.4MB)]


Commentator
Harry de Gorter, Professor, Cornell University
[Presentation Slides (0.5MB)]



Masahiko
Gemma

Simla
Tokgoz

Yacov
Tsur

Harry de
Gorter

Cohost by
Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies (WOJUSS)

Event 2: Disaster Resilience 2030; U.S. and Japan

[Summary]


Date and Time
Feb. 25 (Mon.) 3:00pm-4:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington D.C. 20036


USJI WEEK - Event 2: Disaster Resilience 2030; U.S. and Japan from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


REGISTER

Abstract
Resilience becomes a keyword of disaster management both US and Japan. To build disaster resilience, disaster recovery is important. Now Japan struggles for recovery from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Those experiences will work to build resilience to the possible mega earthquakes of 2030s in Japan. In US, FEMA set up the Strategic Foresight Initiative (SFI), and SFI published the report titled “Crisis Response and Disaster Resilience 2030”. Both US and Japan work to build resilience against future disaster targeting 2030.
This seminar shares Japanese experience of recovery from the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Disaster, and discuss about how US and Japan work to build resilience targeting 2030.


Moderator & Speaker
Haruo Hayashi, Professor, Kyoto University
[Presentation Slides (12.2MB)]


Speakers
Carole Cameron, Director, International Affairs Division, Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
[Presentation Slides Part 1 (0.6MB)] [Presentation Slides Part 2 (2.3MB)]

Norio Maki, Associate Professor, Kyoto University
[Presentation Slides (1.7MB)]

Shingo Suzuki, Assistant Professor, Kyoto University
[Presentation Slides (1.0MB)]



Haruo
Hayashi

Carole
Cameron

Norio
Maki

Shingo
Suzuki

Event 3: The Korean Peninsula in the 21st Century

Date and Time
Feb. 26 (Tue.) 3:00pm-4:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington D.C. 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
Mr. Flake’s talk will present on South Korea’s new administration and the analysis of Korea-Japan relations in an international context. Security issues among South Korea, Japan, and North Korea will also be discussed with regard to the new administration. Themes related to strategic geopolitics in the Korean Peninsula, current issues on the U.S.-Japan, U.S.-South Korea would also be presented.
Professor Fiske will present on the U.S. partnership taxation in relation to project developments in the Korean peninsula. Prof. Fiske is an expert in the U.S. partnership and his presentation will also focus on the simulation cases with regard to prospective project developments which include large-scale infrastructure establishments.
Professor Kataoka is an expert on International Relations focusing on African Studies. Prof. Kataoka’s presentation will focus on the Japanese foreign policy from diverse comparative perspectives.
Professor Rhee will serve as a coordinator and a discussant during the session. Prof. Rhee will briefly introduce the most recent Inter-Korea trade issues and a case on the Kaesung Industrial complex.


Moderator & Discussant
Maji Rhee, Professor, Waseda University

Speakers
L. Gordon Flake, Executive Director, The Maureen and Mike Mansfield Foundation
Jason Fiske, Program Director, Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Sadaharu Kataoka, Professor, Waseda University


L. Gordon
Flake

Jason
Fiske

Sadaharu
Kataoka

Cohost by
Organization for Asian Studies, Waseda University (OAS)

Event 4: Reasoning in Pragmatism and the Analysis of the U.S. Perspective on Japan and Korea (Students Only)

Date and Time
Feb. 26 (Tue.) 6:00pm-7:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington D.C. 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
Louis Menand in his renowned publication, The Metaphysical Club, addresses the process of expansion of democratic ideals in the United States. The philosophical nexus between pragmatism beginning with William James and John Dewey has proved that pragmatism is an essential thought in nurturing societies to mature democracy. The process of reaching to a mature democratic society will be discussed focusing on Dewey’s reasoning on “The Great Public”. The U.S. perspective on Japan and two Koreas will be discussed using examples from modern history and the most recent regional issues.

Moderator & Lecturer
Maji Rhee, Professor, Waseda University

Event 5: The U.S. Pivot to Asia and Japan, China, and Korea - How Can New Leaders in Northeast Asia Maintain the Regional Peace? (Part 1: America's TPP, CJK's Trilateral FTA, and Domestic Adjustment Problems)

[Summary]


Date and Time
Feb. 28 (Thu.) 10:00am-11:40am

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington D.C. 20036


USJI WEEK February 2013 - Event 5: The U.S. Pivot to Asia and Japan, China, and Korea - How Can New Leaders in Northeast Asia Ma from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


REGISTER

Abstract
As the Obama administration continues its rebalancing initiatives in the Asia-Pacific, new political leaders have been chosen in Northeast Asia, namely, Japan, China and the Republic of Korea (ROK) or CJK. With the America’s diplomatic effort, Asia’s fresh leadership may bring out some significant move “forward” for improving the regional order and security environment in the years to come. At the same time, this region suffers diplomatic and domestic destabilizers, such as rising nationalism, territorial and sea lane issues, and socio-economic problems. The US and CJK administrations are expected to control both domestic and foreign affairs smartly to stabilize the region to make it better serve as the engine for the world economic growth.
In this seminar, specialists of US policy on Asia and leading young researchers from Asia will deal with both security and economic aspects of “US pivot” policy and discuss how the CJK regimes will view and react to the US initiatives to see if there is any possibility for significant change in the regional dynamics and political and economic relationships. In addition, specialists of America’s policy toward Asia will share their ideas on how the Obama administration see and react to the new Northeast Asia. This seminar will focus on regional trade arrangements including TPP and CJK trilateral FTA and the domestic adjustment problems related to them, so that we can have better understanding on how such regional economic cooperation may or may not contribute to peaceful Asia.


Moderator & Commentator
Takashi Terada, Professor, Doshisha University / Adjunct Researcher, Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies (WOJUSS)

Speakers
Leonard Schoppa, Professor / Associate Dean for the College, University of Virginia
Michael Martin, Specialist in Asian Affairs / Asia Section / Foreign Affairs, Defense, and Trade Division / Congressional Research Service (CRS)
Junya Nishino, Associate Professor, Department of Law, Keio University / Wilson Center Japan Scholar / Visiting Scholar, Sigur Center for Asian Studies, George Washington University


Takashi
Terada

Leonard
Schoppa

Michael
Martin

Junya
Nishino

Cohost by
Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies (WOJUSS)

Event 6: Introduction to the Project: The Role of the U.S.-Japan Alliance in the Construction of the East Asian Community

[Summary]


Date and Time
Feb. 28 (Thu.) 2:00pm-3:30pm

Venue
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
1779 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20036-2103

Please take note that Event 6 will be held at a different location and will take place at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

USJI WEEK Event 6: Introduction to the Project: The Role of the U.S.-Japan Alliance in the Construction of the East Asian Commun from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


REGISTER

Abstract
The project members will hold a dialogue - type seminar to introduce the project. The aim of the research project is to examine the role of the U.S.-Japan alliance in the comprehensive security of East Asia by reviewing the related realms of traditional and nontraditional security studies-human security, economic security, and energy security - and the future prospects for U.S.-Japan relations. Traditional and nontraditional security will be further explored in terms of the complications involved in U.S.-Japan relations and the East Asian community, with the aim of shedding light on how U.S.-Japan relations contribute to the construction of the East Asian community and how the East Asian community influences U.S.-Japan relations.
This seminar will explore the relationship between the U.S.-Japan security treaty and the East Asian community in the traditional security realms. The Japanese project member will introduce the significance of the U.S.-Japan alliance from Japan’s point of view; the U.S. member will do the same from the U.S. point of view. Together, they will present their conclusions regarding the significance of the U.S.-Japan alliance for constructing the East Asian community. The seminar will determine the direction of the research project, and through discussion with the floor, will uncover its problems and limitations.


Moderator & Dicussant
James L. Schoff, Senior Associate Asia Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Speakers
Toru Oga, Associate Professor, Kyushu University
James J. Przystup, Senior Research Fellow East Asia Group, National Defense University

Discussant
Mike M. Mochizuki, Associate Dean for Academic Programs / Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs, The George Washington University


James L.
Schoff

Toru
Oga

James J.
Przystup

Mike M.
Mochizuki

Cohost by
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Event 7: The U.S. Pivot to Asia and Japan, China, and Korea - How Can New Leaders in Northeast Asia Maintain the Regional Peace? (Part 2: Maritime Security in East Asia and CJK Problems)

[Summary]


Date and Time
Mar. 1 (Fri.) 10:00am-11:40am

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington D.C. 20036


USJI WEEK Event 7: The U.S. Pivot to Asia and Japan, China, and Korea (Part 2) from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


REGISTER

Abstract
As the Obama administration continues its rebalancing initiatives in the Asia-Pacific, new political leaders have been chosen in Northeast Asia, namely, Japan, China and the Republic of Korea (ROK) or CJK. With the America’s diplomatic effort, Asia’s fresh leadership may bring out some significant move “forward” for improving the regional order and security environment in the years to come. At the same time, this region suffers diplomatic and domestic destabilizers, such as rising nationalism, territorial and sea lane issues, and socio-economic problems. The US and CJK administrations are expected to control both domestic and foreign affairs smartly to stabilize the region to make it better serve as the engine for the world economic growth.
In this seminar, specialists of US policy on Asia and leading young researchers from Asia will deal with both security and economic aspects of “US pivot” policy and discuss how the CJK regimes will view and react to the US initiatives to see if there is any possibility for significant change in the regional dynamics and political and economic relationships. In addition, specialists of America’s policy toward Asia will share their ideas on how the Obama administration see and react to the new Northeast Asia. This seminar on security issues will focus on maritime security in the China seas and explores how the US-Japan-Korea security triangle could work to control China.


Moderator & Commentator
Takashi Terada, Professor, Doshisha University / Adjunct Researcher, Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies (WOJUSS)

Speakers
Chikako Ueki, Operating Adviser, U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI) / Professor, Waseda University
Mark Manyin, Specialist in Asian Affairs, Congressional Research Service (CRS)
Scott A. Snyder, Senior Fellow for Korea Studies and Director of the Program on U.S.-Korea Policy, Council on Foreign Relations


Takashi
Terada

Chikako
Ueki

Mark
Manyin

Scott A.
Snyder

Cohost by
Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies (WOJUSS)

Event 8: Evaluating Japanese Growth and Rebirth Strategy?; Is Abe Inheriting DPJ's Policy?

Date and Time
Mar. 1 (Fri.) 2:00pm-3:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington D.C. 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
The seminar will discuss the Japanese cabinet decision, “Rebirth of Japan Comprehensive Strategy”, which is the Japanese government’s latest rebirth and growth strategy. This seminar is the first part of a multi-year USJI research project entitled “Can Japan Come Back?” To begin, Prof. Nakatsuji will outline the government’s strategy and critically evaluate the appropriateness of the strategy for the future of Japan. He will also question to what extent new Prime Minister Abe will inherit the policy. After this two Japan specialists from the US and Japan will join the discussion. Forecasting the future of Japan is important, because it has consequences for the allocation of power in the Asia Pacific region. More directly, the trilateral relationship of the US, Japan, and China will certainly be affected if Japan cannot escape its long stagnation.

Moderator & Speaker
Keiji Nakatsuji, Operating Adviser, U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI) / Professor, Ritsumeikan University

Discussants
Susan J. Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics / Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University
Tadashi Yokoyama, Counselor (Economic Affairs), Embassy of Japan in the United States


Keiji
Nakatsuji

Susan J.
Pharr

Tadashi
Yokoyama

Organized by: U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI)