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  •    U.S.-Japan Research Institute,
       Washington D.C. (Headquarters)
      

       1875 I Street NW, Suite 512,   
       Washington, DC 20006
       Phone: 202-775-4161
       E-mail:
    usjp@us-jpri.org
     

Event
USJI Week


USJI Week Events

Feb. 24 (Mon.)
Event 1 (10:00am-11:30am): Atoms for Dream: Holding the American Umbrella in the Atomic Driving Rain
Event 2 (1:00pm-2:30pm): Worsening Sino-Japanese Relations and the U.S.
Event 3 (3:00pm-4:30pm): Social Innovation: U.S.-Japan Comparison Studies in this New Emerging New Trend in Innovation

Feb. 25 (Tue.)
Event 4 (10:00am-12:00pm): "Abenomics" and U.S.-Japan Relationship
Event 5 (2:00pm-3:30pm): Technological Innovation and Expansion of the Asia-Pacific

Feb. 26 (Wed.)
Event 6 (10:00am-11:30am): Internet Governance in Asia: A New Focus for U.S.-Japan Cooperation?
Event 7 (2:00pm-3:30pm): The Possibilities and Issues of Globalized and Open Higher Education for Japan and U.S. Universities
Event 8 (6:00pm-7:30pm): Transformation of the U.S.-Japanese Relations in Global Governance (Students Only)

Feb. 27 (Thu.)
Event 10 (10:00am-11:30am): Sino-Japan Dynamics and Implications for the U.S.-Japan Alliance

Feb. 28 (Fri.)
Event 9 (10:00am-12:00pm): Building the TOMODACHI Generation: Engaging U.S. and Japanese University Students in Social Problem-Solving

Admission is free, but seating for these events is limited.

Event 1: Atoms for Dream: Holding the American Umbrella in the Atomic Driving Rain

[Summary]

Event 1: Atoms for Dream: Holding the American Umbrella in the Atomic Driving Rain from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 24 (Mon.) 10:00am-11:30am

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
On March 11, 2011 the expansion of the nuclear accident definitively signaled the end of our “Bountiful Postwar.” This incident was the result of the economic growth that we ourselves demanded. In Postwar Japan, before we realized it, nuclear energy was transformed from the fear or radiation exposure into an object of hope, and received as a symbol of dreams and peace. In the context of the public’s everyday life and sense of society, how was this spectacle of a bright future desired and accepted?
Taking as its object Postwar Japan’s embrace of nuclear energy, this talk will investigate the transition from “The nuclear powered sunshine” of the Cold War Period to the “Radioactive Rain” of the Post Cold War Period.
The US-Japan relationship has always been the essential moment in this history. This talk will also show the sharp difference on the representations of nuclear energy in the Japanese and American popular culture.


Moderator
Masako Egawa, Chair, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Executive Vice President, The University of Tokyo

Speaker
Shunya Yoshimi, Vice President, The University of Tokyo

Commentator
Jordan Sand, Associate Professor, Georgetown University


Masako
Egawa

Shunya
Yoshimi

Jordan
Sand

Event 2: Worsening Sino-Japanese Relations and the U.S.

[Summary]

Event 2: Worsening Sino-Japanese Relations and the U.S. from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 24 (Mon.) 1:00pm-2:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
Since the Jiang-Koizumi era, Sino-Japanese relations have been steadily deteriorating. The Tanaka Kakuei-Zhou Enlai period is already long past. Jiang’s mentioning of Japan’s wartime criminal conducts at a state banquet at the Imperial Palace, Koizumi’s repeated visits to Yasukuni shrine, various troubles over the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands, Chinese violent boycotting of Japanese products, China’s defense zone declaration, and Abe’s first visit to Yasukuni shrine as Prime Minister have contributed to dragging relations between the world’s second and third largest economies to a new low. The China–Japan Summit has not been held for quite some time and appears to be an impossibility for at least several months ahead.
The bad relationship is harmful and obstructive to Asia-Pacific regional cooperation. The territorial issue may entrap the United States and create a trilateral imbroglio. The Japanese public has never considered the possibility of a military collision 60+ years as serious as of today.
Can Japan and China return to their friendly relations of past years?


Moderator
Sachio Nakato, Professor, Ritsumeikan University

Speakers
David Arase, Resident Professor, The Johns Hopkins University-Nanjing University Center for Chinese and American Studies
Quansheng Zhao, Professor, American University

Discussant
Thomas W. French, Associate Professor, Ritsumeikan University


Sachio
Nakato

David
Arase

Quansheng
Zhao

Thomas
French

Event 3: Social Innovation: U.S.-Japan Comparison Studies in this New Emerging New Trend in Innovation

[Summary]

Event 3: Social Innovation: U.S.-Japan Comparison Studies in this New Emerging New Trend in Innovation from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 24 (Mon.) 3:00pm-4:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
The concept of innovation itself has been evolving so rapidly. This social innovation is one of the latest developments of innovation. Social innovation practices and studies are still very new for Japan and Japanese. Recently, some young people started their own social businesses, while some highly motivated higher education institutes have launched their own social innovation related courses at their universities. On the other hand, some of the advanced U.S. universities, such as Harvard University, launched social innovation courses (sometimes they are called social entrepreneur courses or social enterprise courses, or social business courses) in the 2000s, and now many other highly motivated universities launched similar courses at their universities. In practices of social innovation, the U.S. has been leading the world: There are many social innovation companies, NPOs and other organizations which have given large impacts over the world practices. In this seminar, researchers in Japanese and the U.S. universities will share experiences and information of this very new concept of innovation in both places side and study/education side between the U.S. and Japan.

Moderator
Yaeko Mitsumori, Associate Professor, University of Tsukuba

Speakers
Gabriel Brodbar, Executive Director, New York University Reynolds Program in Social Entrepreneurship
Greg Van Kirk, Co-Founder, Community Enterprise Solutions


Yaeko
Mitsumori

Gabriel
Brodbar

Greg Van
Kirk

Event 4: "Abenomics" and U.S.-Japan Relationship

[Summary]

Event 4: "Abenomics" and U.S.-Japan Relationship from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 25 (Tue.) 10:00am-12:00pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
One year has passed since Mr. Abe became Prime Minister for the second time. During the past 12 months, a package of economic policies, commonly known as "Abenomics", which consists of aggressive monetary policy, flexible fiscal policy, and growth strategy has been executed. Due to aggressive monetary policy combined with inflation targeting, the yen has been depreciated by more than 20 percent; the stock prices rose more than 60%. Fiscal policy was first stimulation with large public works spending in the first half of 2013, while the consumption tax increase in April 2014 was confirmed. Growth strategy is slow to be implemented despite the long list. The growth rate has become higher and there is a sign that the 15-year deflation is finally over. With a strengthened economy, Mr. Abe has aimed at reaffirming and solidifying the US-Japan alliance. Advocating proactive contribution to peace, he strengthened the National Security Council, and accomplished a significant breakthrough in the relocation of Futenma Air Station in Okinawa. But with his visit to the Yasukuni Shrine, the relations with China and South Korea are perhaps in the worst shape in decades. How economic policies and diplomatic initiatives of the Abe administration will play out in the second year will be discussed in the session.

Moderators
Takatoshi Ito, Professor, The University of Tokyo
Fumiaki Kubo, Director, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Professor, The University of Tokyo / Japan Scholar, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

Speakers
Michael Auslin, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research
Stephan Danninger, Senior Economist, International Monetary Fund


Takatoshi
Ito

Fumiaki
Kubo

Michael
Auslin

Stephan
Danninger

Event 5: Technological Innovation and Expansion of the Asia-Pacific

[Summary]

Event 5: Technological Innovation and Expansion of the Asia-Pacific from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 25 (Tue.) 2:00pm-3:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
This session explores U.S.–Japan relations as it relates to technological innovation. Specifically, the objectives of this session are to examine the role of technological innovation in the enlargement of the Asia–Pacific region. The Asia–Pacific region is a key component when analyzing the U.S–Japan relations. Technological innovations have led to the Asia–Pacific region’s expansion, and we can travel across the region, using shorter routes, and cheaper and easier modes of transportation than before. Thus, the enlargement of the Asia–Pacific region and technological innovation are both key to understanding the nature and formation of U.S.–Japan relations. Consequently, the session examines two cases of technological innovations: (1) steamships in the late nineteenth century; and (2) aviation gasoline technology used during the Second World War. On the one hand, the use of steamships drastically changed the scale and speed of movement, especially with respect to immigrants. On the other hand, aviation gasoline and technology transfer allowed and developed military movement across the Asia–Pacific region. Those two examples also explain the role of technological innovation in reducing distance. The session examines how technological innovations have developed and contributed to the expansion of the Asia–Pacific region as the focus of enhancing U.S.–Japan relations.

Moderator
Toru Oga, Associate Professor, Kyushu University

Speakers
Munehiro Miwa, Professor, Kyushu University
Yuki Ooi, Associate Professor, Nanzan University

Discussants
David S. Painter, Associate Professor, Georgetown University
Daqing Yang, Associate Professor, The George Washington University


Toru
Oga

Munehiro
Miwa

Yuki
Ooi

David S.
Painter

Daqing
Yang

Event 6: Internet Governance in Asia: A New Focus for U.S.-Japan Cooperation?

[Summary]

Event 6: Internet Governance in Asia: A New Focus for U.S.-Japan Cooperation? from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 26 (Wed.) 10:00am-11:30am

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
Asia is the fastest growing part of the global economy and much of this dynamism is coming from the growth of the Internet Economy. As global leaders in the development and deployment of new Internet technologies and business services, Japan and the US are well positioned to drive and benefit from this growth. However, the benefits may not be fully realized unless region-wide agreements can be developed on cross-board data transfer and in sensitive areas, such as privacy policy and cyber security. While the US and the EU are moving ahead to develop common approaches in this area, the dialogue in Asia on Internet governance is still fragmentary and plagued by claims from some governments in the region that national “cyber sovereignty” not a universal “right to access” should be the fundamental organizing principle for the Internet. Can Japan and the US find common ground on principles and proposals for Internet governance in Asia and what mechanisms, e.g. the US-Japan Internet Economy Dialogue, TPP and APEC, might serve as platforms for mobilizing other countries in the region behind this agenda? What might be the building blocks for such an initiative and how concretely can it contribute to Japanese and US company interest in deploying new technologies and services in Asia, such as Cloud Computing, Big Data and the Internet of Things?

Moderator
James J. Foster, Professor, Keio University

Speaker
Jiro Kokuryo, Vice Chair, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Vice-President, Keio University

Panelists
Daniel Castro, Senior Analyst, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
Andrew Harris, U.S. Department of State


James J.
Foster

Jiro
Kokuryo

Daniel
Castro

Andrew
Harris

Event 7: The Possibilities and Issues of Globalized and Open Higher Education for Japan and U.S. Universities

[Summary]

Event 7: The Possibilities and Issues of Globalized and Open Higher Education for Japan and U.S. Universities from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 26 (Wed.) 2:00pm-3:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
Over the past decade, the movement of opening up higher education through the innovative educational use of the Internet such as Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and Open Course Ware (OCW) has been advancing around the world. As the higher education systems and the global labor market are being more globalized, it is becoming increasingly critical and urgent for us to build new higher education systems that are able to flexibly respond to the rapidly changing social needs, as well as to explore how universities ought to keep the balance between international collaboration and competition and contribute to both the local and global societies through education and human resource development.
This seminar explores the possibilities and challenges of how the universities in Japan, the U.S., and other countries should deal with these challenges from what perspectives, in relation with “free trade” in globalized higher education and how to share and accumulate educational resources and knowledge of practice. Some of the possible directions and implications for the future of globalized and open higher education will be discussed.


Moderator
Toru Iiyoshi, Operating Advisor, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Professor, Kyoto University

Speakers
Stephen C. Ehrmann, Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning, The George Washington University
Vijay Kumar, Senior Strategic Advisor for Digital Learning and Director, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


Toru
Iiyoshi

Stephen C.
Ehrmann

Vijay
Kumar

Event 8: Transformation of the U.S.–Japanese Relations in Global Governance (Students Only)

Event 8: Transformation of the U.S.–Japanese Relations in Global Governance from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 26 (Wed.) 6:00pm-7:30pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
This student session promotes discussions among students from Japan and the United States. All students are welcome. Speakers and audience members will engage in discussion directly without any formalities in an informal workshop session. The speakers, students from both Japan and the United States, propose topics concerning transforming relations between Japan and the United States. Each speaker’s presentation will be approximately 10–15 minutes. After completing his or her presentation, the other speakers and the audience discuss the issues surrounding the topic. The session aims to promote dialogue among students from Japan and the United States through examining a number of focal issues in global, regional, and national governance, including transforming the governance and policies affecting the two countries’ relations. To achieve this aim, all students are welcome.

Moderator
Toru Oga, Associate Professor, Kyushu University

Speakers
Minami Nomaguchi, Senior, Kyushu University
(Media and Public Opinions: How Japanese Media Have Broadcasted The U.S. Bases in Okinawa)

Shunsuke Oda, Senior, Kyushu University
(Intergenerational Justice: Ethical Norms and Policy Coordination of Sustainable Development)



Toru
Oga

Event 10: Sino-Japan Dynamics and Implications for the U.S.-Japan Alliance

[Summary]

USJI Week Event 10: Sino-Japan Dynamics and Implications for the U.S.-Japan Alliance from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 27 (Thu.) 10:00am-11:30am

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

The Discussion will:
Examine the recent dynamics that have contributed to heightened tension in the Sino-Japan relationship.
Analyze implications for Washington.
Explore how the United States might help improve the current situation in Northeast Asia.


Background in the Issues
Recent developments in the long-standing territorial and historical disputes between Tokyo and Beijing have caused a sharp rise in tensions and injected a real sense of danger and uncertainty into the relationship between Asia's two most powerful nations. As the United States continues to implement the rebalance to Asia in an effort to sustain stability within the region, understanding the complex dynamics at play in the relationship between these the two key nations is of the utmost importance to U.S. policymakers.

Moderator
Abraham M. Denmark, Vice President for Political and Security Affairs, The National Bureau of Asian Research

Speakers
Hon. Richard L. Armitage, President, Armitage International L.C. / Former Deputy Secretary, U.S. Department of State
Fumiaki Kubo, Director, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Professor, The University of Tokyo / Japan Scholar, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
David M. Lampton, George and Sadie Hyman Professor of China Studies, The Johns Hopkins University


Abraham M.
Denmark

Hon. Richard L.
Armitage

Fumiaki
Kubo

David M.
Lampton

Co-host by
The National Bureau of Asian Research

Event 9: Building the TOMODACHI Generation: Engaging U.S. and Japanese University Students in Social Problem-Solving

Event 9: Building the TOMODACHI Generation: Engaging U.S. and Japanese University Students in Social Problem-Solving from U.S.-Japan Research Institute on Vimeo.


Date and Time
Feb. 28 (Fri.) 10:00am-12:00pm

Venue
Ambassador Room, The Embassy Row Hotel
2015 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC 20036


REGISTER

Abstract
Presentations by international teams of Japanese and American participants of the Building the TOMODACHI Generation program. Teams will propose civil-society based projects to address the challenges faced in the Tohoku Region. Winning project teams will travel to Japan to continue their partnership with a service project in Tohoku. This program is generously supported by the TOMODACHI Fund for Exchanges donors, Mitsubishi Corporation, Toyota Motor Corporation, and Hitachi Ltd., as well as Morgan Stanley.
The two-week Building the TOMODACHI Generation civic engagement program will bring 16 college students from top Japanese universities to Washington, DC from February 15, 2014 to March 1, 2014. The Japanese students will join 12 American peers for a robust leadership-based curriculum that enhances students’ understanding of the principles, challenges and potential of civil society.


Judges
Edson Mori, Senior Investment Officer, Inter-American Development Bank
Michael B. Smith, President, The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars
Katsuichi Uchida, President, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Vice President, Waseda University


Edson
Mori

Michael B.
Smith

Katsuichi
Uchida

Co-host by
U.S.-Japan Council / The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars

Organized by: U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI)