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FEBRUARY 22-26, 2016

Theme: A New Era for Japanese Society

The year 2015 was a turning point in the political and economic order of post-war Japan. National security legislation was passed in September which changed the two constituent elements of the regime upon which post-war Japanese society has been built, the Constitution of Japan and the U.S.-Japan Security Treaty, and this has led to changes in the country’s political structure. Also, agreement in principle was reached on the TPP in October, signifying the start of Japan’s active involvement in building the economic order of the Asia-Pacific region. Surely, with all of the political and economic structural realignment that has taken place, 2015 will go down in history as the start of a new era for Japanese society. In 2016, further change is likely which will extend beyond the realms of politics and economics to encompass society as a whole, leading to a “second opening of Japan to the world.” Given all of this, USIJ Week will use February 2016 to explore a broad range of related issues from the perspective of “A New Era for Japanese Society.”

Event Schedule

Feb. 23 (Tue.)
Event1
(10:30am-11:50am)
Establishing a Global Partnership for Sustainable Development : Emerging opportunities for international collaboration on SDG’s
Feb. 24 (Wed.)
Event2
(10:00am-12:00pm)
Refugees Unwilling to Return: Cases of the Indian Ocean Tsunami, Great East Japan Earthquake, Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy
Event3
(1:00pm-2:30pm)
Plant Science Research for Global Food Security
Event4
(6:00pm-7:00pm)
[Seminar for Students] Election Campaigning: Japanese-style versus American-style
Feb. 25 (Thu.)
Event5
(10:00am-12:00pm)
Environment and Energy Policies in Esat Asia
Event6
(1:00pm-3:00pm)
Rejuvenating Japan’s Economy and Industries – Abenomics in the Long Run
Feb. 26 (Fri.)
Event7
(10:00am-12:00pm)
Competing or Complementing Economic Visions?: Regionalism and the Pacific Alliance, TPP, RCEP, and the AIIB
Event8
(10:00am-12:30pm)
Building the TOMODACHI Generation: Engaging U.S. and Japanese University Students in Social Problem-Solving
Feb. 29 (Mon.)
Event9
(6:00pm-7:00pm)
[Seminar for Students] US-Japan Relations in Geo-Economic Regionalism in Asia: The Rise of the TPP and AIIB (Students only)

Admission is free, but seating for these events is limited.

Event 1 : Establishing a Global Partnership for Sustainable Development : Emerging opportunities for international collaboration on SDG’s

Date and Time

Feb. 23 (Tue.) 10:30am-11:50am

Venue

Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

Abstract

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been set by the UN General Assembly in New York in September 2015, and Paris Agreement was adopted in UNFCCC COP 21 in December 2015. From 2016 we are in the implementation phase to achieve these global goals. How can we do that? Any one country cannot solve these global problems. Moreover, any one field cannot solve these issues. It is pivotal to international cooperation and interdisciplinary. Future Earth was launched as major international research platform to coordinate new, interdisciplinary approaches to research by International Council for Science (ICSU) and international organizations (UNEP, UNESCO, UNU, and WMO) etc. Japan and US have each global hub of Future Earth. In this seminar the possibility of Future Earth to contribution SDGs and the Paris Agreement will be considered in order to enhance the linkage between policy and academia in the USA and Japan.

Moderator
Hassan Virji
Executive Director, International START Secretariat USA
Speakers
Fumiko Kasuga
Visiting Professor, Integrated Research System for Sustainability Science, University of Tokyo
Jon Padgham

Capacity Building Lead, Future Earth Secretariat hub in Colorado

Maria Uhle
Program Director for International Activities / Directorate for Geosciences , National Science Foundation (NSF)
Co-hosted by

Embassy of Japan / International START Secretariat USA

Supported by

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Event 2 : Refugees Unwilling to Return: Cases of the Indian Ocean Tsunami, Great East Japan Earthquake, Hurricanes Katrina and Sandy

[Summary]

Date and Time

Feb. 24 (Wed.) 10:00am-12:00pm

Venue

Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

Abstract

For the Indian Ocean Tsunami in 2004, Hurricane Katrina’s devastation of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast in 2005, and the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011 and the ensuing tsunami and nuclear reactor meltdown, governments in the United States, Indonesia and Japan have had to engage in massive restoration and cleanup efforts to address significant loss of life, tremendous economic damage, and displacement of entire communities. Disasters often provoke immediate responses and aid. For displaced populations, however, the disruptive effects may continue for years as they struggle to return to affected areas. Increasingly, questions are being raised whether damaged areas should be rebuilt in the same way, whether they should be rebuilt differently, or whether people from vulnerable areas should not return to their previous areas of residence. Even when policymakers decide to encourage return, persons displaced by a disaster may decide not to return. Conversely, even if policymakers decide to discourage return, displaced persons may fervently seek to return. This seminar seeks to (1) Increase understanding in the United States, Indonesia and Japan (as well as other countries) regarding the priorities and factors that influence how people displaced by natural disasters decide whether, when, and how to return, and (2) Identify policy approaches that provide incentives and disincentives for evacuees to return to their home communities, and for addressing evacuees’ needs when social or environmental concerns make return impossible or undesirable.

Moderator
nakayama_201409
Mikiyasu Nakayama
Operating Advisor , USJI / Professor, The University of Tokyo
Speakers
bruch_201409
Carl Bruch
Senior Attorney; Co-Director, International Programs, Environmental Law Institute(ELI)
bryner_201409
Nicholas S. Bryner
Visiting Associate Professor, George Washington University
croshaw_201602
Heather Croshaw
Visiting Attorney, Environmental Law Institute(ELI)
Co-hosted by

Environmental Law Institute

Supported by

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Event 3 : Plant Science Research for Global Food Security

[Summary]

Date and Time

Feb. 24 (Wed.) 1:00pm-2:30pm

Venue

Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

Abstract

Establishment of food security is a global issue. Trends show global population has been increasing rapidly, and with it the need to increase global food production becomes an urgent issue. Currently, Japan’s food self-sufficiency rate is 40% which is predicted to increase up to 50% in 2030. However, Japan is aging more rapidly than anywhere else in the world. Even in such a situation, we need to increase food production up to 50% of food self-sufficiency rate while we need to ensure the rest (50%) of the food sources from abroad. The US has contributed significantly as global food supplier to date, and is expected to greatly contribute more to this global issue in the future.
In this project, we intend to summarize research projects related to increased food production between the US and Japan, and pick out priority research projects which contribute to establish global food security. We will propose research policies to funding agencies and government.

Moderator
ezura_201602
Hiroshi Ezura
Professor, University of Tsukuba
Speakers
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Jocelyn Kenneth Campbell Rose
Professor, Cornell University
giovannoni_201602
James J. Giovannoni
Professor, Cornell University
ariizumi_201602
Tohru Ariizumi
Associate Professor, University of Tsukuba
Supported by

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Event 4 : [Seminar for Students] Election Campaigning: Japanese-style versus American-style (Students only)

Date and Time

Feb. 24 (Wed.) 6:00pm-7:00pm

Venue

USJI DC Office,
1901 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 801, Washington, DC 20006

Speaker
Maeshima_201509
Kazuhiro Maeshima
Operating Advisor, USJI/Professor, Sophia University
Supported by

NISSAN GLOBAL FOUNDATION

Event 5: Environment and Energy Policies in East Asia

[Summary]

Date and Time

Feb. 25 (Thu.) 10:00am-12:00pm

Venue

Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

Abstract

In recent years, energy policies and environmental policies have been focal issues in terms of policy creation in East Asia as a whole. Since the 2011 Tohoku earthquake in particular, Japan has been more sensitive to both energy security and environmental protection from nuclear accidents. On the other hand, due to rapid economic growth in China, energy and environmental problems have accelerated and are now affecting neighboring countries. Furthermore, Southeast Asia’s continued rapid economic growth has prioritized energy and environmental problems at the level of policy making. The resulting controversial policy issues are likely to affect not just Japan and China, but also East Asia as a whole.
The panel aims to examine environmental and energy policies and their associated problems in Japan, China, and Southeast Asia, with a particular emphasis on policy frameworks appropriate to addressing energy and environmental concerns. The first focus will be the changing nature of Japanese environmental policies in recent decades, particularly how those policies have evolved in the aftermath of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. The second focus will be China’s energy policies and the issues of pollution control and environmental protection. The third focus will be the current energy and environmental issues in Southeast Asia, especially Indonesia. As part of these discussions, the panel will explore the future development of both energy and environmental policies and their potential effect on Japan, China, and East Asia as a whole.

Moderator
oga_201509
Toru Oga
Associate Professor, Kyushu University
Speakers
watanabe_201602
Tomoaki Watanabe
Assistant Professor, Kyushu University
horii_201602
Nobuhiro Horii
Associate Professor, Kyushu University
takahashi_201602
Masaki Takahashi
Senior Power Engineer, World Bank
Commentators
lewis_201602
Joanna Lewis
Associate Professor, Georgetown University(Cancelled)
livingston_201602
David Livingston
Associate, Carnegie’s Energy and Climate Program
Supported by

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Event 6: Rejuvenating Japan’s Economy and Industries – Abenomics in the Long Run

Date and Time

Feb. 25 (Thu.) 1:00pm-3:00pm

Venue

Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

Abstract

It is not an easy task to overcome the deflationary mentality deeply rooted in the Japanese economy, which was fermented during “the lost two decades”. The Abe Cabinet, which launched the new policy mix customarily called Abenomics. Abenomics consists of three “arrows” that represent a monetary policy, fiscal policy, and economic growth strategies to encourage private investment. For the First Arrow, the Bank of Japan promoted the generation of a 2 percent rate of inflation target through “monetary easing of a different dimension”. The Second Arrow was a stimulus fiscal policy, with a particular focus on public infrastructure projects. The ultimate outcome of Abenomics critically depends on the Third Arrow—the microeconomic and structure reforms through which corporations can conduct their businesses in a more effective manner. In the latter half of 2015, however, many people have started questioning the ultimate outcome of Abenomics, while the global economy seems to be negatively affected by China’s slowing growth and the sharp decline of oil prices.
In this workshop, panelists from different backgrounds will review the achievements of Abenomics and its long term prospects from different viewpoints. They will discuss Abenomics’ political and economic impact on US-Japan relations, review Abenomics from a macroeconomic perspective, including its monetary policy and long term prospects, and examine it from a microeconomic viewpoint, with particular reference to technology and service issues.

Moderator
hikino_201602
Takashi Hikino
Associate Professor, Kyoto University(Cancelled)
Speakers
fukushima_201602
Glen S. Fukushima
Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress / University Professor, Waseda University
mori_201502
Junichi Mori
Vice Chair, U.S.-Japan Research Institute / Professor and Vice President for international Relations of Kyoto University
hara_201602
Yoshinori Hara
Professor, Kyoto University
Supported by

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Event 7: Competing or Complementing Economic Visions?: Regionalism and the Pacific Alliance, TPP, RCEP, and the AIIB

[Summary]

Date and Time

Feb. 26 (Fri.) 10:30am-12:00pm

Venue(TBD)

Auditorium, Wilson Center
One Woodrow Wilson Plaza, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington DC 20004

Webcast available here

Abstract

From establishing new rules for furthering trade to reassessing the future of development assistance, the roadmap for growth in the Asia-Pacific region is facing a current of sweeping change. The question is how regionalism could continue to boost the economic potential in Asia and beyond, or whether new groupings forming new rules will lead to greater political rivalries in the region and impede growth. Join us to discuss the impact of economic regionalism as a result of the Pacific Alliance, the Trans Pacific Partnership, the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership, and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, with a focus on evolving relations between the Asia-Pacific and Latin America.

Moderator
shihoko_goto_201509
Shihoko Goto
Senior Associate for Northeast Asia, Asia Program, Wilson Center
Speakers
hughes_201602
Kent Hughes
Public Policy Fellow
moreira_201602
Mauricio Mesquita Moreira
Principal Economist, Trade and Integration Sector, Inter-American Development Bank
terada_201309
Takashi Terada
Operating Advisor , USJI / Professor, Doshisha University
Co-hosted by

Wilson Center
wilsoncenter

Event 8: Building the TOMODACHI Generation: Engaging U.S. and Japanese University Students in Social Problem-Solving

Date and Time

Feb. 26 (Fri.) 10:00am-12:30pm

Venue

The Washington Center Residential and Academic Facility
1005 3rd Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

Abstract

Presentations by international teams of Japanese and American participants of the Building the TOMODACHI Generation program. Teams will propose civil-society based projects to address the challenges faced in the Tohoku Region. Winning project teams will travel to Japan to continue their partnership with a service project in Tohoku. This program is generously supported by the TOMODACHI Fund for Exchanges donors, Mitsubishi Corporation, Toyota Motor Corporation, and Hitachi Ltd., as well as Morgan Stanley.
The two-week Building the TOMODACHI Generation civic engagement program will bring 20 college students from top Japanese universities to Washington, DC from February 13, 2016 to February 27, 2016. The Japanese students will join 15 American peers for a robust leadership-based curriculum that enhances students’ understanding of the principles, challenges and potential of civil society.

Judges
uchida_201502
Katsuichi Uchida
President, USJI / Assistant to the President for Global Affairs, Waseda University
cook_201502
Christopher Joseph Cook
Chief Compliance Officer, Keel Point Advisors
Co-hosted by

U.S.-Japan Council / The Washington Center for Internships and Academic Seminars
Print

Event 9: [Seminar for Students] US-Japan Relations in Geo-Economic Regionalism in Asia: The Rise of the TPP and AIIB (Students only)

Date and Time

Feb. 29 (Mon.) 6:00pm-7:00pm

Venue

USJI DC Office,
1901 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Suite 801, Washington, DC 20006

Abstract

The upsurge of recent policy activity around the TPP and AIIB is one sign of the intensifying Sino-US struggle to shape the economic and political order in the Asia-Pacific, characterised by the attempts of each power to impose their respective sets of norms and rules on regional economic agendas. More specifically, the US push for TPP and China’s promotion of AIIB indicate the pronounced rise of conceptual competition over economic governance and development in Asian ‘geo-economics’. This seminar examines the regional implications of Japan’s and America’s engagement in TPP and non-commitment to AIIB in spite of China’s persistent requests for its participation, and illustrates Japan’s increasingly assertive institutional balancing behaviour with the US vis-à-vis China amidst the ongoing Sino-US power struggle over Asian geo-economics.

Speaker
terada_201309
Takashi Terada
Operating Advisor , USJI / Professor, Doshisha University
Sponsored by

NISSAN GLOBAL FOUNDATION

Organized by: U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI)

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