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SEPTEMBER 8th -16th, 2016

Event Schedule

Sep. 8th (Thu.)
Event1
(6:30pm-7:30pm ) STUDENTS ONLY
Is the TPP Really Undesirable for the United States?
Sep. 9th (Fri.)
Event2
(10:00am-11:30am)
Between and Betwixt: ASEAN and the Re-balance within Asia
Sep. 12th (Mon.)
Event3
(2:00pm-3:30pm)
Issues Related to Immigration and Foreign Workers: Implications to Japan
Sep. 14th (Wed.)
Event4
(2:00pm-3:30pm)
Role of Government in Promoting Small Innovative Firms: the Small Business Research Initiative in the U.S. and Japan
Sep. 15th (Thu.)
Event5
(10:00am-11:30am)
Translational Research based on Molecular Craniofacial Developmental Biology and Development of Related Clinical Activities in Dentistry
Event6
(2:30pm-4:00pm)
2016 US Presidential Election; Japanese Perspectives (…………………..……………..…….…………)
Event7
(6:00pm-7:30pm)
Japanese American in the U.S.—Messages for Leaders of the Next Generation
Sep. 16th (Fri.)
Event8
(10:00am-11:30am)
Natural Gas Hydrate – Present and Future

Admission is free, but seating for these events is limited.

Event 1 : [Seminar for Students] Is the TPP really undesirable for the United States? (Students Only)

Date and Time

Sept. 8th (Thu.) 6:30pm-7:30pm

Venue

USJI Washington Office
1901 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Suite 801, Washington DC 20006

Abstract

In the wake of the Brexit, the TPP has attracted international attention as the potential last resort to serve to cut off the negative chains of economic nationalism. However, both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton mentioned the TPP won’t be passed in their Governments, jeopardising the international free trading system. This lecture argues the desirability of the TPP for the United States from a Japanese perspective through shedding a light on its broader merits, such as political contribution to the US-Japan relations and strategic tool in the geo-economic competition with China, in addition to economic contribution as normally focused on. It is designed to help students’ comprehension of the pact in a wider context, involving a variety of analytical angles for their discussions.

Speaker
Takashi Terada
Operating Advisor, USJI / Professor, Doshisha University

Event 2 : Between and Betwixt: ASEAN and the Re-balance within Asia

Date and Time

Sept. 9th (Fri.) 10:00am-11:30am

Venue

Wilson Center

Abstract

The power struggle between China and the United States has led to a competition between Beijing and Washington to bring like-minded countries into their respective folds. With the ongoing conflict between the two countries changing the security, trade, and diplomatic landscape of the Asia-Pacific region, there has also been a rise in Southeast Asia-centered regionalism. ASEAN’s unity has diminished amid a rise of two camps, one pro-United States, and one pro-China. In addition, the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement has divided Southeast Asian nations between TPP and non-TPP members. At the same time, the changing dynamics has increased expectations for Japan not just economically, but also politically as well as militarily. This discussion will outline some scenarios concerning the future of ASEAN by focusing on the evolving great power competition and prospects for ASEAN centrality.

Co-Hosted by

Wilson Center
wilsoncenter

Moderator
shihoko goto
Shihoko Goto
Wilson Center
Speakers
Takashi Terada
Operating Advisor, USJI / Professor, Doshisha University
MarkManyin
Mark Manyin
Specialist in Asian Affairs, U.S. Congressional Research Service
Rumi Aoyama
Professor, Waseda University
Marvin Ott
Marvin Ott
Asia Fellow, Wilson Center

Event 3 : Issues Related to Immigration and Foreign Workers: Implications to Japan

Date and Time

Sept. 12th (Mon.) 2:00pm-3:30pm

Venue

JSPS Seminar Room
Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

  • REGISTER

Abstract

Today the world is witnessing massive influx of people, triggered by political and economic crises, mostly from Syria and Afghanistan to Europe.  Issues over immigration are posing various political implications, among which is the rise of populism prevalent in the US (so-called “the Tramp phenomenon”) and in the UK (“Brexit”).  Although such issues have already attracted scholarly attention (and Japanese media is paying attention to them recently), much needed is a critical and thorough examination of potentials and challenges regarding immigration.
Meanwhile, Japan has been maintaining “no immigration” policy in the post-WWII period.  In reality, however, its labor market is increasingly relying on foreign workers.  This critical gap is calling for a serious discussion on immigration policy within the government and in society.  Should Japan begin immigration?  How?  And, what is the best way to accept and integrate immigrants into the Japanese society?
In this panel, we would like to discuss implications of the issues related to foreign workers as well as future immigrants in Japan with some comparative perspectives.

Moderator
Aiji Tanaka
Operating Advisor, USJI / Professor, Waseda University
Speakers
faculty_toake
Toake Endoh
Professor, Hawaii Tokai International College
Chung
Erin Aeran Chung
Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins University
Apichai W. Shipper
Adjunct Associate Professor, Georgetown 0University’s School of Foreign Service
Supported by
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

USJI Summer Reception

Date and Time

Sept. 12th (Mon.)

JFKIIIJPKIII_and_UchidaUSJI Reception

(Left) Honorable Joe Kennedy III / (Middle) Joe Kennedy III and USJI President Uchida

The USJI summer reception was held at the St Regis Washington, D.C.. Policy makers from government agencies, private sectors, researchers and students from both U.S. and Japan attended. Honorable Joe Kennedy III made his speech and shared his family stories from their visit to Japan: one of which included that how wonderful Japanese medical care was, and they were impressed and grateful for the treatment they had received. He quoted an Irish proverb he said he grew up with: “There are good ships and wood ships, ships that sail the sea, but the best ships are friendships, may they always be”, and he expressed his wish for growth for young generation and US-Japan friendship. The reception provided a unique opportunity for the participants to strengthen U.S.-Japan partnership.

Event 4: Role of Government in Promoting Small Innovative Firms: the Small Business Research Initiative in U.S. and Japan

Date and Time

Sept. 14th (Wed.) 2:00pm-3:30pm

Venue

JSPS Seminar Room
Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

  • REGISTER
Abstract

The role of government in promoting technological innovation has drawn much attention of scholars and policymakers. Due to the lack of effective model to promote technological innovations based on scientific breakthroughs, Japan has lost its industrial competitiveness since the turn of the century. Japan’s trade deficit in bio-medical industry has increased rapidly in recent years and reached approximately two trillion yen in 2013. In search of a way to create robust innovation ecosystems in Japan, this panel explores the role of government in creating and promoting small innovative firms by discussing the U.S. government’s Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, which was created in 1982. We hope to highlight the strength and challenges of the current SBIR program (Portnoy), examine its historical background and political origin (Yang-Yoshihara), and discuss the factors that have been hindering the successful operation of the Japanese SBIR (Yamaguchi).

Moderator
Eriko Kawai
Eriko Kawai
Operating Advisor, USJI / Professor, Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability (GSAIS), Kyoto University
Speakers
Matthew Portnoy
Matthew Portnoy
Director, Division of Special Programs, Office of Extramural Programs
NIH SBIR/STTR Program Manager, Office of Extramural Research, National Institutes of Health
Mariko Yoshihara Yang
Mariko Yoshihara Yang
Japan Program Fellow, Visiting Scholar, Stanford University
Affiliate Professor, Ritsumeikan University
Eiichi Yamaguchi
Eiichi Yamaguchi
Professor, Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability (GSAIS), Kyoto University
Supported by
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Event 5: Translational Research based on Molecular Craniofacial Developmental Biology and Development of Related Clinical Activities in Dentistry

Date and Time

Sept. 15th (Thu.) 10:00am-11:30am

Venue

National Institute of Health (NIH)

Building 30, Room 117,
9000 Rockville Pike
Bethesda, Maryland 20892

  • REGISTER

Abstract [agenda]
Because the inborn specific abnormality that the phenotype appears in a face and the oral cavity affects chewing, speech, breathing as well as swallowing function, The cleft lip and/or cleft palate that are representative inborn specific abnormality show a phenotype on face. The occurrence rate ranges from one of 500 births to one of 700 births in the world.
We carry out translational research to develop the regenerative therapy of the bone defect with the cleft lip and/or cleft palate that used carbonic acid apatite as bone substitution materials and/or mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp to accomplish the molecular developmental biological study, and to elucidate molecular basis of the development of face particularly lips and palate or the development of tooth.
In the seminar, Prof. Nonaka will present the results of the recent accomplishment in his Lab regarding neuronal differentiation of stem cells from exfoliated deciduous teeth, and Prof. Mori will give the proposal for medical care system for congenital anomaly in the face on the basis of his clinical contribution in south-east Asia, including clinical application of the results of the translational researches.
Moderator
Ichiro Takahashi
Ichiro Takahashi
Operating Advisor, USJI / Professor, Kyushu University
Coordinator
Yoshihiko Yamada
Yoshihiko Yamada
Senior Investigator, Section Chief, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, NIH
Speakers
Kazuaki Nonaka
Kazuaki Nonaka
Professor, Kyushu University
Yoshihide Mori
Yoshihide Mori
Professor, Kyushu University
Eva Mezey
Eva Mezey
Senior Investigator, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, NIH
Supported by

NIH Japanese fellow meeting (Kinyo-kai)

Event 6: 2016 US Presidential Election; Japanese Perspectives

Full (Registration closed)

Date and Time

Sept. 15th (Thu.) 2:30pm-4:00pm

Venue

JSPS Seminar Room
Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

Abstract

This panel aims to explore current US-Japan relationship with regard to the 2016 US presidential election. More specifically, four scholars will examine this from their respective areas of expertise, ranging from national security and politics, to cultural significance.

Moderator
Kazuhiro Maeshima
Operating Advisor, USJI / Professor, Sophia University
Speakers
Tadashi Anno
Associate Professor, Sophia University
Michael Bailey
Professor, Georgetown University
Kevin M. Doak
Professor, Georgetown University
Supported by

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Event 7:Japanese American in the U.S.—Messages for Leaders of the Next Generation

Date and Time

Sept. 15th (Thu.) 6:00pm-7:30pm

Venue

USJI Office Seminar Room (2000M)
2000 M Street, Washington DC 20006

  • REGISTER
Abstract

Japanese began immigrating to the United States and its territories starting in the mid-19th century. Until about 1970, Japanese-Americans were the largest Asian-American group. Today, they are the sixth largest Asian-American group and comprise only 0.4% of the total U.S. population. Like many other immigrant communities, the Japanese faced prejudice and bigotry. However, after Japan’s December 7, 1941 declaration of war on the United States, Japanese immigrants and US citizens of Japanese ancestry were subjected to an even more difficulties and intolerance. Despite this, many Japanese-Americans served and fought with distinction on both fronts of WWII even though their families were incarcerated. Building on those sacrifices and lessons, today, numerous Japanese-Americans hold senior government and corporate positions and hold seats in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. The history and story of the Japanese has only now begun to be told and shared. This seminar features three distinguished members of the Japanese-American community speaking about their backgrounds, challenges, and successes. This seminar is intended to inspire students but we welcome all generations to participate in this important program.

Moderator
Kazuhiro Maeshima
Operating Advisor, USJI / Professor, Sophia University
Speakers
murakami_201409
Mary Tamaki Murakami
cyncia_photo
Cynthia Izuno Macri
Allen Goshi
Noriko Sanefuji

Event 8: Natural Gas Hydrate – Present and Future

Date and Time

Sept. 16th (Fri.) 10:00am-11:30am

Venue

JSPS Seminar Room
Washington Office, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
2001 L St., NW, Suite 1050, Washington DC 20036

  • REGISTER

Abstract

Now, around 80% of energy is supplied by fuels, such as oil, coal and natural gas. This trend will continue at least 50 years although other energy supply, such as wind, solar, nuclear, so on due to most of energy forecasts, such as IEA outlook 2015. The natural gas is especially important because C/H ratio is low, which indicates that the impact to global warming is less. The natural gas hydrate is one of important candidate to supply natural gas as similar to the shale gas which is developed and supplied in USA. The natural gas hydrate spreads the Pacific Ocean including USA and Japan.
Natural gas hydrate is also expected to use natural gas in middle distance from product area to consumption area.
Thus, we have been doing basic research on fundamentals of natural gas hydrate to contribute future middle and long range energy strategy.

Moderator
Toshihisa Ueda
Toshihisa Ueda
Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University
Speakers
Ryo Ohmura
Ryo Ohmura
Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University
Derek Dunn-Rankin
Derek Dunn-Rankin
Professor, University of California, Irvine
Supported by

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) /
Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Washington DC Office

Organized by: U.S.-Japan Research Institute (USJI)

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